Bringing the Past Back to Life

About the Guild

The Preservationist Guild is a consortium of talented professionals who have combined to form an experienced and dynamic development company. Whether creating a new project or faithfully restoring an old one, we train a mindful eye through the windows of the past.

Our Work

Our past developments include real estate of every type: Commercial, Industrial, Mixed-Use, Retail, Residential and Historical. Following is just a small sampling of our work.

Current Project

Liberty
Hall

Developed by John Adams 2018
Designed by D.Tracy Ward Architect & John Adams
Cecil Brown - Builder
Delivered 100% pre-leased

Liberty Hall is a 33,000 square foot mixed-use building in the heart of Alpharetta. 100% pre-leased. Delivery July 2018.

Situated directly opposite City Hall and lining main street, the Italianate architecture will pair old-world elegance with modern panache, a beautiful addition to one of the most charming and vibrant commercial cities in the southeast.

The building will house an upscale restaurant called Prairie (owned by Historic Hospitality Group) on the first floor and cellar. The second and third floors will be occupied with office tenants, one of which will be the borrower. The fourth floor will house a private social club called The Founders Club which has a part of its membership base the mayors of both Alpharetta and Milton as well as a veritable who’s who list of Georgia.

Crabapple
Mercantile
Exchange

$18MM Developed by John Adams circa 2008
Designed by D.Tracy Ward Architect & John Adams
Cecil Brown - Builder
Delivered 94% leased
Appraised for $360 per foot in 2008

Crabapple Mercantile Exchange is a 53,840 sq. ft. Mixed-use Development at the Crabapple Community in Milton, Georgia, a North Atlanta suburb.

22,532 square feet of retail space
23,467 square feet of office space
7,841 square feet of residential lofts

The buildings are constructed of structural steel frames wrapped with four sides of hand made brick featuring authentic 18th and 19th century architectural elements, such as a Beaux Arts gate from France made in the 1880s, old world gas lanterns, and eleven foot high period storefronts.

To further add to the old world charm of this development and stay true to history, Crabapple Mercantile Exchange’s “D” Building will be a replica of the Milton County Courthouse that was constructed in the late 1800s and stood until 1955 at the site of the present day Alpharetta City Hall.

The Developer carefully selected tenants that provided for a synergistic mix, and targets upscale boutique style businesses, such as antique stores, women’s clothing boutiques, old world barbershops, confectionaries, floral shops, jewelry stores, upscale restaurants, and more.

Ellard
Mercantile
Exchange

$19.7MM Developed by John Adams Circa 2007
Designed by D.Tracy Ward Architect & John Adams
Cecil Brown - Builder
Delivered 92% leased
Appraised for $350 per foot in 2007

As the final phase of the award-winning Ellard Village Mixed-Use Development, Ellard Mercantile Exchange is the crown jewel of the Chattahoochee River corridor.

Ellard Mercantile Exchange is located at 8450-8480 Holcomb Bridge Road in Roswell, GA. The 2.2 acre site is zoned Fulton County Annexed allowing for a wide range of retail and office tenants. Being part of a master development, John Adams was able to build 56,297 square feet while still maintaining a parking ratio in excess of four spaces per one thousand square feet. This property was a unique and rare find and one of the few remaining undeveloped parcels of land in the affluent North Atlanta Suburb.

Ellard Mercantile Exchange consists of four buildings constructed of a structural steel wrapped on all four sides with hand made brick and carved stone. The buildings feature authentic eighteenth and nineteenth century architectural artifacts. Some of the antiquities included are: a stained glass window from Germany crafted and hand painted in 1892; ten foot tall solid mahogany doors that are over two hundred years old and were imported from Argentina; one hundred fifty year old hand carved English oak doors with a French oak pediment; and Romeo and Juliet cast iron balconies imported from France, circa 1825.

“We shape our buildings; thereafter, they shape us.”
Winston Churchill